Inkjet print DMF plates


#1

Hi everyone! Thought this could be useful for all.

To rapidly prototype new plates, I’ve been printing DMF plates on photo-glossy paper with silver nanoparticle ink. You can you standard while photo glossy paper or PET translucent film. The ink is from AgIC (http://agic.cc/) and prints on a Brother inkjet printer. We’ve specifically been using a Brother MFC-J430W (http://support.brother.com/g/b/downloadtop.aspx?c=us&lang=en&prod=mfcj430w_all). I just printed out a batch of 90-pin-array plates (PDF included here). I printed them on the Brother printer with the printer settings set to the options show in the included images (print_settings1 & print_settings2 files). The best channel spacing you can get with the Brother printer is 125 um. I figured this out by both testing connections between pads and imaging the pads printed on PET film on our microscope. I’ll dig out those pics. You could literally see splotches of ink bridging the gap between pads. Pretty cool.

I’ve included lots of pics here, so take a look. I also made a “DIY pogo pin connector” for a smaller switch board I made before I got my DropBot PCB boards. I designed it in Eagle and cut it out on a desktop mill. Pre-bent male headers probably would have been nice, but I didn’t have those at the time.

~Dot

DMF-90-pin-array_x4.pdf (197 KB)


#2

Fantastic Dorothy !
We were trying INK Jet at Waag as well , bit different model of the Brother printer.

Question for me is why PET did not work at Waag … likely wrong type of PET. Also markings of Agic pen did not conduct when drawing on PET . Only glossy paper worked .

Parafilm on top of printed paper was sort of enough to move the drop for a while on singel layer but after a while electrodes would get connected (likely due to high voltage pushing particles in single layer design ) … funny that 10 days ago I wanted to try with top plate design to overcome above but then I had issue with PC/printer link …

few questions:

1.What brand of PET did you use ?
2.How did drops move & how high was the voltage ?
3.Wat did you use for insulator & hydrophobic layer? Saran wrap , oil ?

and Thank you for sharing ,

Branko


#3

Awesome!
I’m glad you’ve used our technology and made it work.

Let me know if there’s anything I can help.

···

Yoshi


#4

Hi Dorothy,

We’ve been working on the silver-ink printing and found some tweaks too to increase resolution of the printed electrodes.

Although resolution is much higher now we’re still around 150um gap between electrodes.

We’ve also played around with some coatings and found some good combinations that avoid expensive equipment and you can perform in a common lab.

Here’s a video.

While trying to print the 4-row chip design I couldn’t reach a resolution high enough to actually print the wiring in between the electrode plates.

How much interspace did you use in between electrodes? And electrode-wiring-electrode? Did you switch off/on diffusion in advanced settings?

I would expect you to have at least 450um gaps if 125um is

We also noticed that increasing saturation reduces printer resolution and that Y and X axis printing has a bias that shows up in horizontal or vertical gaps. potentially leading to contacts in between electrode patches.

This may be due to printer as it is a 2nd hand one.

I’m interested too in the coatings if you can share that.

Best,

Federico

···

Il giorno sabato 3 ottobre 2015 03:48:56 UTC+2, dorothy silverman ha scritto:

Hi everyone! Thought this could be useful for all.

To rapidly prototype new plates, I’ve been printing DMF plates on photo-glossy paper with silver nanoparticle ink. You can you standard while photo glossy paper or PET translucent film. The ink is from AgIC (http://agic.cc/) and prints on a Brother inkjet printer. We’ve specifically been using a Brother MFC-J430W (http://support.brother.com/g/b/downloadtop.aspx?c=us&lang=en&prod=mfcj430w_all). I just printed out a batch of 90-pin-array plates (PDF included here). I printed them on the Brother printer with the printer settings set to the options show in the included images (print_settings1 & print_settings2 files). The best channel spacing you can get with the Brother printer is 125 um. I figured this out by both testing connections between pads and imaging the pads printed on PET film on our microscope. I’ll dig out those pics. You could literally see splotches of ink bridging the gap between pads. Pretty cool.

I’ve included lots of pics here, so take a look. I also made a “DIY pogo pin connector” for a smaller switch board I made before I got my DropBot PCB boards. I designed it in Eagle and cut it out on a desktop mill. Pre-bent male headers probably would have been nice, but I didn’t have those at the time.

~Dot