DropBot 2.1 hardware released


#1

Hi everyone,

We just pushed up the v2.1 hardware designs to the website and git server. You can find instructions for ordering PCBs and a zip file containing all of the KiCAD, and gerber files on the wiki:

http://microfluidics.utoronto.ca/trac/dropbot/wiki/BuildInstructions

This new design is a minor update to the v2.0 series. The biggest changes are:

  1. The new high-voltage switching boards are 2-layer (previously they were 4-layer). This means that they are cheaper to fabricate and can now be ordered on a single panel with the rest of the PCBs.

  2. The new high-voltage switching boards have their own microcontroller. Previously they used a general purpose input output (GPIO) chip, which was one of the most difficult chips in the system to solder because it was so tiny! In the future, having a microcontroller on these boards will make it possible to add new functionality.

  3. All surface mount capacitors/resistors now have a minimum size of 1206 (previously, some of the capacitors were much smaller and more difficult to solder manually).

  4. All of the boards now have hardware support for in-system programming (meaning that in the future, it will be possible to flash the firmware for all of the microcontrollers over a single USB cable automatically).

If you have any questions/comments, post them to the dev list. If anyone gets boards assembled using the stencil reference numbers, let us know. We’re curious to see how that works out.

-Ryan

···


Ryan Fobel | PhD Candidate | Wheeler Microfluidics Lab | http://microfluidics.utoronto.ca
DropBot: open-source DMF | http://microfluidics.utoronto.ca/dropbot

Institute of Biomaterials & Biomedical Engineering | University of Toronto
160 College Street Room 440 | Toronto, ON M5S 3E1
Tel: 416.946.5702 | Fax: 416.946.3865


#2

This is fantastic news! Thanks for all of the hard work that has gone into this effort.

–Michael

···

On Friday, July 25, 2014 3:49:56 PM UTC-7, Ryan Fobel wrote:

Hi everyone,

We just pushed up the v2.1 hardware designs to the website and git server. You can find instructions for ordering PCBs and a zip file containing all of the KiCAD, and gerber files on the wiki:

http://microfluidics.utoronto.ca/trac/dropbot/wiki/BuildInstructions

This new design is a minor update to the v2.0 series. The biggest changes are:

  1. The new high-voltage switching boards are 2-layer (previously they were 4-layer). This means that they are cheaper to fabricate and can now be ordered on a single panel with the rest of the PCBs.
  1. The new high-voltage switching boards have their own microcontroller. Previously they used a general purpose input output (GPIO) chip, which was one of the most difficult chips in the system to solder because it was so tiny! In the future, having a microcontroller on these boards will make it possible to add new functionality.

  2. All surface mount capacitors/resistors now have a minimum size of 1206 (previously, some of the capacitors were much smaller and more difficult to solder manually).

  1. All of the boards now have hardware support for in-system programming (meaning that in the future, it will be possible to flash the firmware for all of the microcontrollers over a single USB cable automatically).

If you have any questions/comments, post them to the dev list. If anyone gets boards assembled using the stencil reference numbers, let us know. We’re curious to see how that works out.

-Ryan


Ryan Fobel | PhD Candidate | Wheeler Microfluidics Lab | http://microfluidics.utoronto.ca
DropBot: open-source DMF | http://microfluidics.utoronto.ca/dropbot

Institute of Biomaterials & Biomedical Engineering | University of Toronto
160 College Street Room 440 | Toronto, ON M5S 3E1
Tel: 416.946.5702 | Fax: 416.946.3865